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Exercises from Leap of Perception

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Every chapter in Leap of Perception is peppered with useful exercises you can do to experience your own consciousness-and-energy and the dynamics of your changing perception. Just getting an intellectual understanding of an idea isn't enough — we must integrate the understanding all the way down to our cells!

BALANCE THE LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES OF YOUR BRAIN
1. Sit quietly, with your back supported and your head level. Breathe in and out easily, slowly, deeply. Feel your brain inside your head.
2. Imagine the two hemispheres of your brain, and notice whether one side seems bigger than the other. Perhaps one side feels hard, one side soft. Or one feels darker, the other lighter. Just notice.
3. Imagine that between the two sides there is a partition. Reach in with your imaginary hand and pull out the partition. Now nothing is in the way, and the sides of your brain can communicate freely with each other.
4. Let the energy from the bigger, lighter, softer side flow into the smaller, darker, harder side and fill it, integrating and changing it in some way. Then do the reverse, letting the energy from the smaller, darker, harder side flow into its partner. Each time you do this exchange, let the two sides of your brain talk and give information to each other (you don’t need to know what it is). Keep the back-and-forth exchange going until both sides feel equal and balanced.
5. Now notice your eyes and adjust them in your imagination until they, too, feel equally sensitive and unstrained. Do the same thing with your ears until they feel equally open and alert.
6. Smile, and feel the left and right sides of your mouth and facial muscles. Adjust them so they are equally relaxed and your smile feels even.

WHAT DO YOU ALREADY KNOW?
1. Think of a problem, question, or issue you’ve been preoccupied with for awhile. Close your eyes, center yourself, and breathe easily and deeply.
2. Bring the situation or question to the front of your mind, then feel your desire for an answer, insight, and understanding. Ask yourself: “What do I already know about this situation?” Remember that your question and answer exist together at the same time and are tied together.
3. Write what comes to you in your journal, without thinking it over or monitoring your answer. If the writing stops, ask about it again: “What else do I already know about this? What wants to happen so everyone wins? What is the best timing? Who else might need to be involved? What do I need to know before things will progress? What am I learning from this experience?”

ACTIVATE PRESENCE WITH ATTENTION
1. With the next person you have an exchange with, bring your attention fully into your body and the present moment. Remember that you are the soul, perceiving through the eyes of your personality, and really notice the other person, without labels or judgment. To do this, find quietness inside yourself. Being a neutral yet compassionate observer is the beginning of presence.
2. Place your attention on, around, and in the other person, softly and gently, as though it is golden or diamond light. Pay close attention to the way the other person speaks and moves, to their personal vibration, to any intuitive clues you pick up. Don’t match the other person’s vibration. Stay in your own home frequency.
3. Notice what they’re saying and why it’s important to them. Validate what they’re saying by acknowledging that you understand. While you’re attending to them, open your heart and appreciate them for who they are; feel the soul quality inside them.
4. Notice if there is something you’d like to say to them that comes from your appreciation, and say it. Be mindful that this isn’t about you making an impression or being validated; it’s about finding the soul everywhere in the moment, generated by both of you equally.
5. Is there a subtle shift in the other person during this process? You might notice if they relax and open up a bit, or smile. Perhaps they reciprocate your appreciation in some way.
6. Try practicing this with an animal, a tree, or your car, and write about what you notice.

UNDERSTAND YOUR DISTRACTION HABITS
1. In your journal, list the ways you allow your attention to be distracted, especially when a task you want to finish suffers as a result.
2. List your most common ways of multitasking. Which of them are actually dangerous to you and/or to others? Which ones are disrespectful to others? Which ones cause you to miss important information? Which onesreinforce passivity and lack of creativity? List any other ways your distraction habits may detract from or handicap your overall health, wellness, happiness, and success.
3. For each of your distraction and multitasking behaviors, what is your deep, core motivation for wanting to do it—for preferring it to another activity? What feeling or insight might you be avoiding?
4. Of all the things you routinely do, what is most useful to invest the most undivided attention in? What activities will you commit to choosing over others to maintain safety and health?

 


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